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International Studies Minor

The international studies minor provides a broad international perspective for students who plan careers in business, government, medical and psychological services, the legal profession, or education. The courses in this minor allow students to expand their concept of social and ecological responsibility in the global arena. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the international studies major. A minimum of 12 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.

International Studies Minor Requirements
(18 credits)

Students must complete 18 credits from the following areas. Nine (9) credits must be at the 3000/4000 level, and a minimum of 6 credits must be in non-Western courses.

Select 3 credits from the following courses:

HUMN 1200 - Introduction to World Religions (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to significant forms of religion around the world, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as tribal religious traditions and beliefs. The course will focus on the historical development of these faiths, as well as look at the worldview of each of these traditions, to develop a better understanding and appreciation for the diverse religious traditions of the world.

INST 1500 - Global Issues (3 credits)

This course examines some of the increasingly complex and diverse issues confronting humanity. It examines the great diversity of opinion that people hold on important global issues, such as population, natural resource utilization, development, human rights, and values. Students may not receive credit for both INST 1500 and GLBS 1500.

Select 9 credits from either the Arts, Literature, and Culture subject area or from the History, Law, and Government subject area, and select 6 credits from the other subject area:

Arts, Literature, and Culture Subject Area

ARTS 3300 - Myth and Art (3 credits)

This course focuses on the relations between verbal and visual arts, particularly the myths and epics of Europe and the Mediterranean world, and the later literary, religious, and artistic traditions developing from them. Prerequisites: One ARTS course and COMP 2000 or COMP 2000H or COMP 2010 or COMP 2020.

HUMN 2300 - Introduction to World Mythology (3 credits)

This course provides a broad overview of myths from various geographic areas and historical periods, including Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Celtic, Germanic, Asian, North and South American, African and Australian traditions. The course emphasizes the importance of myth in world cultures. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HUMN 2350 - Introduction to Folklore (3 credits)

This course explores various definitions of folklore, focusing on the ways that literature, art, music, performance, and religion all contribute to a culture. Students will be exposed to multiple storytelling techniques and how the many disciplines included in the study of folklore can be understood as forms of narration that tell the story of a culture's evolution. Folklore of different ethnographic backgrounds will be covered, including modern American folklore. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HUMN 2400 - Introduction to Celtic Studies (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the languages, literatures, history, art, mythology and cultures of the Celtic peoples of Europe, from ancient Gaul, Britain and Ireland to the 21st century. Prerequisites: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

HUMN 3800 - Mexican Cult of Death in Myth and Literature (3 credits)

This course examines the Mexican Cult of Death as an ubiquitous theme in Mexican arts and letters. Prerequisites: One ARTS, FILM, HIST, HUMN, LITR, or PHIL course; and COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

HUMN 4200 - Asian Thought* (3 credits)

An introduction to the fundamental teachings of significant religious and philosophical systems of Asia, offering a broad overview of such topics as Wu Wei, karma, reincarnation, impermanence, the nature of the mind, the paths of enlightenment, and basic practices such as meditation and compassionate action. Prerequisites: one ARTS, FILM, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL or THEA course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.

LITR 2030 - World Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of selected masterpieces by international writers from antiquity through the Renaissance, emphasizing the evolution of world culture. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

LITR 2031 - World Literature II (3 credits)

A survey of selected masterpieces by international writers from the 17th century through the 20th century, emphasizing the evolution of world culture. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

LITR 3510 - Irish Literature (3 credits)

A study of Irish and Celtic literatures, focusing on early Irish myth and medieval literature translated from Gaelic, the literature of the Irish Renaissance in the early 20th century, and contemporary Irish poetry and prose. Prerequisites: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

LITR 3530 - Caribbean Literature (3 credits)

A study of Caribbean literature from early post-Colombian literature, such as slave narratives and travel writing, to modern Caribbean poetry and prose. The emphasis is on literature written in English, but the course includes works that have been translated into English from other languages, including French and Spanish. This course provides an introduction to the literature of the Caribbean and a framework for studying that material. Prerequisites: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

LITR 3540 - Latin American Literature* (3 credits)

A survey of Latin American literature in translation. Prerequisite: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H. 

LITR 4510 - King Arthur (3 credits)

This course traces the origins and development of the legend of King Arthur, Queen Guinevere, and the Knights of the Round Table from the 5th to the 21st century. Prerequisites: one LITR course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020. 

SPAN 3240 - Introduction to Spanish Literature (3 credits)

An introductory literature course intended to familiarize students with the literature of Spain from the medieval period until the twentieth century and to develop skills in literary analysis. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or SPAN 3000 or a Spanish Challenge Exam score of 93 or higher.

SPAN 3250 - Introduction to Latin American Literature* (3 credits)

An introductory literature course intended to familiarize students with the literature of Latin America through selected readings in all genres and to develop skills in literary analysis. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or SPAN 3000 or a Spanish Challenge Exam score of 93 or higher. 

SPAN 4900 - Special Topics in Spanish Literature (3 credits)

An in-depth study of a period, an author or a literary genre in the Spanish language. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in Spanish. May be repeated once for credit, if content changes, and with written consent of division director. Prerequisite: one 3000-level SPAN course. 

History, Law, and Government Subject Area

HIST 2150 - Latin American and Caribbean History (3 credits)

This course involves a survey of Latin America and the Caribbean history from the 15th century to the present. Beginning with an examination of indigenous cultures at the time of European arrival, the course will trace the impact of colonialism, slavery, and political revolution on the history of Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will also provide an overview of modern American systems and societies and their place in a rapidly changing, increasingly interdependent world. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.

HIST 2400 - African History* (3 credits)

This class will focus on Africa as a vast continent that is characterized by enormous ethnic, religious, geographic, and historical diversity. Emphasis will be on the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on Africa and Africa's relations with the outside world. European colonization of Africa and the extent to which it shaped the modern history of the continent; and the history of South Africa and the rise and fall of the Apartheid Regime. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H. 

HIST 2500 - Topics in Asian History* (3 credits)

The course explores different themes and issues in Asian history. The instructor will introduce students to key themes and ideas through lectures and readings, and engage with students in exploring selected topics through in-class discussions and exercises. Student assignments will emphasize the examination of historical evidence in an effort to assess how these key themes and issues have shaped specific Asian peoples, states, and societies.

HIST 3240 - Irish History (3 credits)

This course will study Irish history from the Neolithic era to the 21st century, focusing on the colonial relation between Britain and Ireland, including the 17th-century Plantation, the Cromwellian and Williamite wars, the United Irishmen and the 1798 Rising, the Act of Union, the Great Hunger (Famine) and emigration to America, and the formation of the Irish Republic and the Northern Irish state in 1922. Prerequisites: one HIST course; and COMP 2000 or COMP 2010 or COMP 2020 or COMP 2000H.

PHIL 3530 - Gods and Chariots (3 credits)

A study of the classic works of philosophy focusing on Plato and Aristotle, and might include discussion of various Pre-Socratic and Hellenistic philosophers. The emphasis throughout will be on understanding, analyzing, and evaluating arguments of the philosophers and placing their work into the historical context of the respective eras in which they lived. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

PHIL 3540 - Revolution and Ideology (3 credits)

A study of the classic works of philosophy focusing on the rationalists, the empiricists, and Kant. The emphasis throughout will be on understanding, analyzing, and evaluating arguments of the philosophers and placing their work into the historical context of the respective eras in which they lived. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

HUMN 4400 - Issues in Latin American Development and Sustainability (3 credits)

In this course, theory and history are combined in an attempt to understand the various forces that have shaped development in Latin America, past, present and future. We start by examining divergent theories of development and their applications to the region. The historical roots of modern institutions are explored. The course then turns to the modern political and economic challenges confronting the region. The role of the state, the market, and the informal sector in the development process will be debated, as well as the prospects of reform and sustainable development in the future. Prerequisites: COMP 2000 or 2020 and INST 1500 or HIST 2130 or HIST 2140.

POLS 2010 - Comparative Government (3 credits)

This course will examine the elements of foreign political systems such as constitutions, political parties, institutions, historical development, and ideology using the United States as a frame of reference. Attention will be given to how legislation is enacted, how elections are conducted, and the relationship between the judicial, executive, and legislative branches of government.

POLS 2300 - International Relations (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to various theories and concepts used by scholars in the field of international relations and demonstrate their practical application to understanding major issues in contemporary international politics such as war, globalization, international trade and finance, the role of international organizations, ethnic conflict and peacekeeping, proliferation of nuclear weapons, migration and poverty, and the role of international organizations and NGOs. Prerequisite: COMP 1500 or COMP 1500H.

POLS 3500 - Global Politics (3 credits)

This course offers an issue-based examination of world politics. Drawing on theories and practices in the field of international relations, the course will examine pressing and important problems in the world today such as global warming, terrorism, failed states, international public health, transnational organizations, human rights, drug trafficking and global crime. Each issue will be framed in appropriate theoretical, historical and contemporary perspectives, and problem solving exercises will be utilized in order to arrive at a fuller understanding of the dynamics of world politics. Prerequisites: POLS 2300 and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

POLS 4100 - European Union (3 credits)

This course will examine the historical development, the political parties, and the institutions (Commission, Parliament, Council of Ministers) of the European Union. Attention will be given to how European Union policies are developed, enacted and enforced as well as the effect of European rules upon the domestic legal systems of the twenty-seven member states. Students will consider to what extent the European Union will continue its development in terms of both increased horizontal and vertical integration. Students will also appraise to what extent the European Union protects the human rights and economic interests of its citizens and how effectively it functions as a unit in the international arena. Prerequisites: POLS 1200 and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

POLS 4200 - Latin American Politics (3 credits)

This course will examine the politics of Latin America. Emphasis will be placed on the political, economic, and social developments that have contributed to Latin America?s current state of development. The course will also examine the political development of Latin American states, the impact of the Cold War, internal political conflict and the role of the military in these conflicts, and democratization and social movements. Some of the aspects that will be highlighted are the effect of colonization on the region's economic development, the impact of revolution, and the effects of migration. Experiential Education and Learning (ExEL): Successful completion of this course satisfies 1 ExEL unit. Prerequisite: POLS 1200 and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

POLS 4300 - Middle Eastern Politics (3 credits)

This course will examine the politics of the Middle East. Emphasis will be placed on the political, economic and social developments that have contributed to current tensions in the Middle East. The course will also examine the political development of Middle Eastern states, the phenomenon of Arab nationalism, Islamism, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, democratization, oil and economic development and regional security. Some of the aspects that will be highlighted are an understanding of the Arab-Israeli conflict, events surrounding Iraq, and changing patterns in other countries such as Iran, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt. Prerequisite: POLS 1200 and COMP 2000 or 2020 or COMP 2000H.

* Non-Western courses

The academic program and curriculum requirements listed on this page are from the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog. Students are bound by policies and curricula published in the catalog in effect the semester they enter the university, unless an agreement is made with appropriate NSU administration officials allowing them to abide by policies published in a later catalog.

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